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Posts for: March, 2019

By Family Foot Health Center
March 26, 2019
Category: Foot Condition

Onychomycosis--that's the medical term for toenail fungus, a stubborn and common foot infection. At Family Foot Health Center in Howell, NJ, your podiatrist, Dr. Richard Lesser treats numerous cases of toenail fungus, helping people of all ages have clearer, and better shaped nails. Are you struggling with toenail fungus?

Toenail FungusWhat is toenail fungus?

Organisms called dermatophytes actually thrive on toenail debris, the cells your nails naturally shed all the time. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society says that a full 20 percent of the American population has thick, discolored, and even smelly nails due to:

  • Blunt force injury to the nail bed
  • Constant friction between the nail and inside of the shoe
  • The warm, dark, moist environment of closed toe shoes, especially athletic footwear
  • Shared towels and nail clippers
  • Dirty, sweaty socks
  • Treading on wet locker room and gym floors (a common breeding ground for athlete's foot fungus, too)

Additionally, individuals with weak immune systems, diabetes, and circulatory problems tend to get toenail fungus, and the infection may spread to other areas of the body, including fingernails.

How your podiatrist in Howell, NJ, can help

If you have persistent onychomycosis, come to the Family Foot Health Center in Howell, NJ, where Dr. Lesser will examine your nails and surrounding skin. He may prescribe a topical ointment or cream or an oral anti-fungal medication to rid your toes of the problem for good. Extreme cases may require toenail removal.

Also, Dr. Lesser may suggest some simple strategies to keep your feet and nails fungus-free for good. These practices include:

  • Wearing well-ventilated shoes in warm weather
  • Changing shoes often, particularly athletic shoes
  • Wearing clean, moisture-wicking (not cotton or wool) socks daily
  • Washing your feet daily with soap and water and drying them thoroughly
  • Using clean nail clippers and not sharing pedicure/manicure tools with others
  • Trimming toenails straight across
  • Wearing flip-flops at the pool or in the gym locker room

We can help

At Family Foot Health Center, Dr. Lesser treats numerous foot and ankle conditions, including stubborn toenail fungus. Let him help you achieve great podiatric health by calling the Howell, NJ, office today for a consultation: (732) 370-1100.


By Family Foot Health Center
March 06, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Is heel pain keeping you down? Pain that occurs following an injury or early in an illness may play a protective role, warning us about the damage we have suffered. SoYour Heel Pain Could Be Plantar Fasciitis what causes heel pain?
 
Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition in which a band of tissue in the sole of the foot becomes inflamed, leading to severe heel pain. The pain can be so bad that it hurts to walk, much less exercise or perform daily activities. If one step causes shooting pain in your heel—especially when you first get out of bed in the morning or stand up after sitting for a long period of time—plantar fasciitis may be to blame. Contact your podiatrist immediately for proper diagnosis and treatment of your pain. 
 

Understanding Heel Pain with Help from Your Podiatrist

Plantar fasciitis, or heel pain, occurs when the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension. This causes the soft tissue fibers of the fascia to tear or stretch at points along its length, leading to inflammation, pain and possibly the growth of a bone spur where it attaches to the heel bone.
 
Inflammation may become irritated by shoes that lack appropriate support, mainly in the arch area and by the constant irritation associated with an athletic lifestyle. Resting may provide temporary relief, but when you resume walking you may experience a sudden elongation of the fascia band, which stretches and pulls on the heel. As you walk the pain may lessen or even disappear, but that may just be a false sense of relief, as the pain will often return after prolonged rest or extensive walking.  
 
You can take steps now to avoid heel pain, including:
  • Wear shoes that fit well
  • Wear proper shoes for each activity
  • Do not wear shoes with excessive wear on heels or soles
  • Prepare properly before exercising by stretching and warming up
  • Pace yourself when you participate in athletic activities
  • Don’t underestimate your body’s need for rest and good nutrition
  • Lose excess weight
If pain and other symptoms of inflammation persist, you should limit your normal daily activities and contact your podiatrist immediately.